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July 2013 Torque - The Other Duramax(s)

GM’s 2.5L and 2.8L Diesel Engines

Text By , Photography by GM

It is the engine we have been dreaming about: a small, four- cylinder diesel wearing the Duramax badge. Good news…it’s here and has brought a friend! Bad news…for us living here in the United States, we are still limited to drooling over photos, for now.

The Engines
These two Duramax engines can be found in both 2.5L and 2.8L displacements, and they share many of the same components. Both of these engines use the same block and cylinder head, along with many other internal and external components. The modular design of both engines’ basic architecture enables an easier transition between versions on the assembly line, which helps speed up production while cutting cost.

Both Duramax mills utilize a high-pressure common-rail fuel injection system, have a single turbocharger, and are intercooled. However, the 2.8L features a Garrett variable-geometry turbo, while the 2.5L’s is a fixed-geometry unit. Inside, the pistons are graphite-coated cast-aluminum for reduced friction and power loss, hydraulic valve lash adjusters eliminate the need for periodic adjustments, and quick-start glow plugs promote fast engine starting in colder climates. The 2.8L also uses a balancer shaft to aid in reducing engine vibrations.

Engineered for a wide range of global markets, these two engines use an electronic throttle valve and cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) as a means of reducing harmful tailpipe emissions. Both engines meet Brazil’s stringent emissions requirements without the need for a diesel particulate filter (DPF), which helps to reduce costs for these vehicles sold in markets with standards at or below that of Brazil. The U.S. and European markets will likely require both a DPF and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to meet their tighter emissions standards.

2.8L
180 hp at 3,800 rpm
346 lb-ft of torque at 2,000 rpm

A. Iron cylinder block
B. Aluminum DOHC cylinder head
C. High-pressure common-rail fuel injection
D. Electronic throttle valve
E. Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)
F. Variable geometry turbocharger
G. Laminated steel oil pan with upper aluminum section that provides a balance of engine rigidity and quietness

2.5L
150 hp at 3,800 rpm
258 lb-ft of torque at 2,000 rpm

A. Iron cylinder block
B. Aluminum DOHC cylinder head
C. High-pressure common-rail fuel injection
D. Electronic throttle valve
E. Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)
F. Single fixed-geometry
G. Laminated steel oil pan with upper aluminum section that provides a balance of engine rigidity and quietness

Where To Find Them
Unfortunately for us, these engines are only found internationally. They are built in a 584,000-square-foot facility in Rayong, Thailand—which has the capacity to produce 120,000 engines per year—and are available in the Chevy Colorado and TrailBlazer, as well as the GMC Canyon. Rumor has it that the “world” Colorado, currently sold in Thailand and other emerging Asian, South American, and African countries, will be making its way to the U.S. sometime in the coming years—and with it will come a diesel engine. There have also been rumblings lately that the Cadillac ATS will be receiving a version of the 2.8L Duramax for the ’14 model year, but that it will not wear the Duramax name. If any of these rumors are even partly true, we all have one more thing to be excited about.

SOURCES
General Motors Co
Detroit
MI
313-556-5000
http://www.gm.com
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