Diesel Power
Mobile Icon BtnMobile Icon Btn RO
Newsletter

1992 Dodge W250 - Old And In The Way

Ron Allen’s 1,199hp Sleeper

Text By , Photography by

A lot of folks might think Ron Allen’s ’92 Dodge W250 is just another old truck. Old, and in the flow of traffic, slowing them down. That is, until they try and pass him! “I got the truck in 2002,” said Ron. “And shortly after, I was cut off in a lane merge by a Power Stroke with a utility bed. There was horrible traffic, and I had to make a U-turn, then a right turn, and it was 20 minutes before I was back on the freeway again.” It was during those 20 minutes that Ron vowed he would never be squeezed out of a lane again.

A Brief History
Shortly thereafter, the Brown’s Valley, California, resident enlisted the help of such diesel pioneers as Brad Ponci, Piers Harry, and Nowell Thomas for his build. “We got a 25,000-mile 5.9L VP44 engine,” said Ron. “But we couldn’t figure out how to hook up all the electric thingies.” It was then that Nowell Thomas suggested a P-pump. Once the truck was P-pumped in 2004, things sort of spiraled out of control, and it became a testbed for new parts. “I figure it’s had about 20 sets of injectors and 10 sets of compound turbos on it since then,” remarked Ron.

1,199 hp and Counting
After 10 years of planning, you can bet the current engine combination is stout. After the 5.9L, Ron felt the need for a displacement increase, so he switched to a 6.7L Cummins with ARP main studs, a stud girdle from Randy’s Engine and Machine, coated pistons, and Cunningham connecting rods. He also had the head fitted with bigger valves, added ARP 625 head studs, and had it fully ported by ZZ Custom Fabrication. A Hamilton cam with 188 degrees of duration on the intake and 220 degrees on the exhaust activates the 110-pound valvesprings. The engine was assembled by ALC Machine in Santa Rosa, California.

With a solid foundation, Ron then turned to the power-producing parts. A set of quick-spooling ball-bearing Garrett turbos (GT4094R and GTX5593) were added, along with 7x0.013-inch Exergy Engineering injectors, and a 13mm injection pump from Northeast Diesel Service. Boost comes in at a fairly modest 70 psi, because the rest of the engine is so efficient. The same can be said for EGT, which will barely touch 1,400 degrees on a full-throttle blast.

Supporting Hardware
With a long road to his crazy power numbers, it should come as no surprise that Ron needed to upgrade the drivetrain as well. “We figured there was no way the Dana 70 was going to survive, so we picked up a Dana 80 out of a wrecked second-generation Dodge,” he said. Surprisingly, the Dana 80 axle is stock, retaining the 3.55 gears and limited-slip differential it originally came with. The real cash outlay is in the transmission, which was initially built by Ponci’s Diesel Center, and then freshened up by Jefferson State Diesel after a dragstrip mishap. The 47RH has a Goerend valvebody, low-stall torque converter, and 300M shafts to handle the power.

Behind the Wheel
So now that it’s 2012—10 years after he bought the truck—how does Ron like it? “It’s awesome,” he said. Ron reports that the larger-displacement engine, along with the ball-bearing turbos, makes it drive and tow like a 400hp truck. On a recent trip through the hills with 9,000 pounds of wood, he reported he never even saw 1,000 degrees on the pyrometer. “It still gets darn near 20 mpg and cruises down the freeway with 625 degrees on the pyro,” he said. He thought for a second, and then added, “If only those guys in the Power Stroke ran into me now.”

Enjoyed this Post? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, or use your favorite social media to recommend us to friends and colleagues!
1 comments
Diesel Power